Superior Turf Pennsylvania

215-794-8700

1735 Swamp Rd
Furlong, PA 18925

Sod Grower Pennsylvania

Quality Turf Grass Sod

Superior Turf is Pennsylvania's largest supplier of premium turf grass sod! Our sod fields in Bucks County produce the highest quality Kentucky Bluegrass and Tall Fescue grass. We supply sod for residential lawns, contractors, and athletic fields. We also offer the full range of sod installation services including laser grading and drainage control.

Practical Benefits of Turf Grass

Immediate Beauty and Value
Within just a few hours, sod transforms bare soil into a lush and beautiful carpet of grass. Landscaping with turfgrass from a top quality sod farm in Pennsylvania immediately increases the market value of property from 10-15%!

No Waiting, Enjoy Your New Lawn in Days
Sod will root down in about 10 days and can be ready for rough play within weeks. A seeded lawn cannot be used for months and will not stop the soil or seed from washing or blowing away. Sod can also be installed any time.

Environmental Benefits of Turf Grass

Just one acre of grass can absorb hundreds of pounds of fossil-fuel created sulfur dioxide in a single year. Lawn areas in the U.S. could store up to 37 billion pounds of carbon. Grass is the most effective plant available for reconditioning the soil. The grass and trees along our country's interstate system produce enough oxygen to support 22 million people!
Natural Fertilizer and Soil Improvement
Your own lawn is the most natural and economical fertilizer available on the market today. Consider that every individual plant of Kentucky bluegrass produces about 3 feet of growth a year. The average lawn produces about 233 pounds of clippings every year for every 1,000 square feet of turf area. Leaving these clippings on the lawn and allowing them to decay and decompose in place is the equivalent of three applications of lawn fertilizer.

This process also builds up humus, keeps soils microbiologically active and, over time, improves soils physically and chemically. Grass is the most effective plant available for reconditioning the soil. An extremely important function of turf grasses is soil improvement through organic matter additions derived from the turnover of roots and other plant tissues that are synthesized in part from atmospheric CO2 via photosynthesis. A high proportion of the world's most fertile soils have been developed under a vegetative cover of grass (Gould, 1968*) Gould, F.W. 1968. Grass Systematics. McGraw-Hill, New York.

NOTE: Survey data was collected by the Maryland Agricultural Statistics Service which also tabulated the results and wrote the findings. This work was done under the direction of M. Bruce West, State Statistician. In addition, experts from the University of Maryland and private sectors provided valuable data and expertise needed to assess the scope and impact of the turf industry in the state.
Oxygen
Our air is cleansed by plants through the process of photosynthesis. Green plants take in carbon dioxide and water and use the energy from sunlight in photosynthesis, which produces carbohydrates for the plant to live off of and releases the true breath of life ... pure oxygen.

A turf area 50' x 50' produces enough oxygen to meet the every day needs of a family of four and each acre of grass produces enough oxygen for 64 people a day.

The grass and trees along our country's interstate system produce enough oxygen to support 22 million people!

NOTE: Survey data was collected by the Maryland Agricultural Statistics Service which also tabulated the results and wrote the findings. This work was done under the direction of M. Bruce West, State Statistician. In addition, experts from the University of Maryland and private sectors provided valuable data and expertise needed to assess the scope and impact of the turf industry in the state.
Air Quality
In recent years progress seems to have been made in improving our air quality. But the levels of nitrogen oxide, sulfur dioxide and particulate matter in our atmosphere, primarily from the burning of carbon based fuels, are still a major concern.

Plants absorb these gaseous pollutants into their leaves and break them down, thereby cleaning the air. An acre of flourishing growth will absorb hundreds of pounds of sulfur dioxide during a year.

Grass also takes in carbon dioxide, hydrogen fluoride and peroxyacetyl nitrate ² the worst group of atmospheric pollutants. Grasses in the United States also trap an estimated 12 million tons of dust and dirt released annually into the atmosphere. This dust, dirt and even smoke are trapped in part by the grass leaves, where it is washed into the soil system by water condensed on the leaves and rainfall. Grassed areas significantly lower the levels of atmospheric dust and pollutants.

NOTE: Survey data was collected by the Maryland Agricultural Statistics Service which also tabulated the results and wrote the findings. This work was done under the direction of M. Bruce West, State Statistician. In addition, experts from the University of Maryland and private sectors provided valuable data and expertise needed to assess the scope and impact of the turf industry in the state.
Carbon Retention
Lush lawns throughout the U.S. turn out to be a "sink" for carbon dioxide, pulling the greenhouse gas out of the atmosphere as they grow. The effect is more pronounced when grass clippings are left to decompose in place, boosting growth by providing nitrogen.

In a study conducted by Cristina Milesi, Ph.D., a NASA research scientist and reported in the journal of Environmental Management, it is suggested that some 40 million acres of America are covered in lawns, making turfgrass our largest irrigated crop.

All told, Milesi estimates, "2 percent of the U.S. land surface that is covered in lawns could account for about 5 percent of the carbon dioxide absorbed by all plants. She also suggests that lawn areas in the U.S. could store up to 37 billion pounds of carbon.

David Elstein, writing for the Agricultural Research Service reports that a study conducted by ARS and Colorado State University of golf courses estimated that “nearly a ton of carbon per acre is stored in the soil of fairways and greens”.

So the next time you’re walking across your lawn, strolling through a park, enjoying a day at the ballpark or watching youngsters play on grass, take a look at what's under their
feet. Among the many other environmental benefits of turf grass, it also helps to rid the atmosphere of carbon dioxide by capturing CO2 through photosynthesis and sequestering some of it in the soil.
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